Wray Castle & Claife Viewing Station  

The western shore of Windermere is perfect for a car-free adventure for all the family. Why not travel over on the ferry from Bowness? In less than 15 minutes you’ll leave the busy eastern shore behind you and arrive at the naturally beautiful west shore. From here you can discover the mystical heights of Claife Viewing Station and learn about its colourful history.
The Station courtyard is perfect for picnics followed by a gentle wander up the slope where you’ll be rewarded with panoramic views of Windermere, at the top. Claife Viewing Station is also the best place to set out on the 4-mile lake shore track, that leads you north towards Wray Castle. This gentle, linear route is great for exploring on bikes or foot. You could make the journey into a loop by returning to Bowness and Ambleside on the boat from Wray Castle or Bark Barn, or, refuel at the café at Wray Castle and re-trace your steps back to the Ferry. Click each picture for web link

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claife viewing station

As the A591 winds its way north from Ambleside to Keswick it passes close to the shores of Rydal Water and Grasmere offering glimpses of these two beautiful lakes.The A591 however is not the only route that links Ambleside and Grasmere, at a higher-level running through the meadows of Rydal Park and across the slopes of Nab Scar, is a very much older track. It dates back a very long time and is called locally, the Coffin Road, due to the fact that the only consecrated ground for burial in the area was the grave yard at St Oswalds in Grasmere and it was therefore used to convey coffins on their final journey.  Walking the Coffin Road from Ambleside to Grasmere then taking advantage of the bus for the return journey makes an excellent outing.  Once in Grasmere it is also worth making a detour around the churchyard of St Oswalds, it's a beautiful and peaceful place and makes a perfect end to the walk. Wordsworth and his family are buried here and an interesting time can be had reading the head stones and viewing the church that in parts date back to Norman times. Walk Route: Ambleside - Grasmere  Duration: 3 - 4 hours  Miles: 4

Loughrigg Fell from Ambleside

Loughrigg Fell just on the outskirts of Ambleside is a superb vantage point for the surrounding fells. For one so short in stature it makes up for any lacking in height by having fantastic views all around and an interesting and complicated top.

Coffin Route - Ambleside to Grasmere 

Ambleside – Wansfell Pike – Troutbeck round

Wansfell lies 1.5 miles east of Ambleside and is part of the long southern ridge of Caudale Moor that divides Ambleside from the Troutbeck valley. It has an extensive summit ridge with two summits named Baystones a grassy hummock marked by a few stones at 488metres (1,601) and Wansfell Pike an attractive rocky top at 482 metres (1,581 feet). The summits are linked by a dry stone wall and even though Wansfell Pike is the lower top it is regarded as the true summit because of its superb views especially of Windermere Lake.  Click on picture for detailed walk

The Fairfield Horseshoe from Ambleside

The Fairfield Horseshoe is a very popular circular ridge walk starting from Rydal or Ambleside that takes in all the fells that surround the valley of Rydal Beck. The circular is about 10 miles from Rydal or 11 miles from Ambleside. The horseshoe with 1100 metres of ascent includes the peaks of Low Pike 508m, High Pike 656m, Dove Crag 792m, Hart Crag 822m, Fairfield 873m, Great Rigg 766m, Heron Pike 612m and Nab Scar440m. Click on picture for detailed walk

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The Rum & Coke Gang

Rydal Water September 2016

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